SEATTLE WASHINGTON<br />886.405.4485

 

STONINGTON GALLERY CALENDAR

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Address: 125 South Jackson Street | Seattle, WA | 98104

Telephone: 206.405.4040 | Toll Free: 866.405.4485

Email: art@stoningtongallery.com

Mailing List: To join our mailing list, please send us a message at art@stoningtongallery.com. The mailing list is email only.

Business Hours (PST): Weekdays 10am-6pm | Saturday 10am-5:30pm | Sunday 12pm-5pm

Since 1979, Stonington Gallery has represented the finest contemporary Northwest Coast art. Our artists work in many media, styles and traditions, and are at the forefront of Pacific Northwest culture and art. The gallery offers full framing services and outstanding customer service. Visit us for exhibitions and events, and keep abreast of news here at our website or on Facebook.

Stonington Gallery facilitates many commissions between artists and collectors each year. Please contact the gallery with inquiries about commissioning works for your collection.

        

 

July 7 - 31

Hib Sabin

 

Solo Exhibit

 

Opening Reception: First Thursday, July 7

6-8pm

 

We are proud to present a solo exhibition of new work by sculptor Hib Sabin (Non-Indigenous) in July, featured works in juniper, bronze and glass. Sabin continues his exploration of human nature by way of animal forms, embodying our best and worst qualities in cackling ravens, haughty owls, and dignified bears. Complex tableaus with multiple creatures interacting--such as "Ship of Fools"--show us the folly of letting the blind and proud navigate treacherous waters. Sabin also debuts new collaborative pieces made with glass-blower Peter Wright.

 

 

August 4 - 28, 2016

Raven Skyriver

PACIFIC

Opening Reception: First Thursday, August 4th

6-8pm

 

Raven Skyriver returns to Stonington Gallery after a whirlwind year of blowing, teaching and exhibiting in places as diverse as Japan, Turkey and Norway. He continues to add to his arsenal of techniques and expertise, using some of the most complex and difficult procedures to create marine creatures that are astoundingly lifelike. The exhibition this year will bring an incredible Mahi Mahi (shown above) blown this past spring at Pilchuck Glass School, and many more works of dazzling coloration, gravity and audacity.

 

September 1 - 30, 2016

Thomas Stream

 

Opening Reception: First Thursday, September 1st

6-8pm

 

Thomas Stream returns to Stonington Gallery with an eye for beauty and detail, continuing his beloved Aleut Painting series. For many years his "mini" paintings have been small jewels prized by Stream collectors for their delicacy and size. In this September exhibition, Stream revisits some of his most successful minis--including Seattle Wren (above)--and expands them to fill walls and frames in full-sized versions. Stream's eye for rendering minute detail has never been more masterful.

 

October 6 - 30

20 Years of Weaving by

Dr. Susan Pavel


 

In Connection with the Exhibition at Suquamish Museum

 

Opening Reception: First Thursday, October 6

6-8pm

 

In October we present an exhibition of new Coast Salish-style weavings by one of the contemporary masters of the art, Dr. Susan Pavel (sa'hLamitSa). Coast Salish weaving is a specific genre and technique unto itself. The art was retained by a few master weavers, including the latesubiyay Bruce Miller, a Skokomish spiritual leader, who chose Pavel as an apprentice in the mid-1990s. Pavel, who is not Native, was chosen to carry on the technique by Miller, and has herself now taught over 500 students. 

Pavel says, "We started as just two. Now, there are hundreds. My students have taught other students. Now I know that this will not die with me when I go. The journey has been and continues to be remarkable. The essence of weaving is fulfilled because ... I am obedient to the call."

In summer 2016 she will have a major retrospective exhibition at the Suquamish Museum of her weavings--both new and from her archive. The new works will be available in her exhibition at Stonington Gallery in October.

One of Pavel's greatest achievements was the task of making the first new mountain goat hair blanket that has been woven in 100 years.  

“One of the great acts of survival is to adapt Salish weaving that had waned for quite a period of time,” said Michael Pavel, Pavel's husband and subiyay Bruce Miller’s nephew.  Michael spent 12 years gathering the wool for the blanket, tuft by tuft. It took Pavel about six months to weave it. The blanket entered the Seattle Art Museum's permanent collection in 2007. There was much fanfare, including the presentation of the blanket to Lummi elder and weaver Fran James (shown above).

"The blanket is a triumph of an ongoing quiet renaissance in Coast Salish weaving carried on by Indian and non-Indian weavers from Vancouver Island to Puget Sound and the Washington coast," wrote the Seattle Times in 2007.

Traditionally, Salish blankets/clothing are woven using a variety of animal and plant fibers including mountain goat wool, canine hair, hemp, fireweed, milkweed, cattail, cotton grass, and yellow and red cedar bark. Various plants were used to create the colors used in dying the wool. Bark from Oregon grape, stinging nettles, various lichens, and alder bark were some of these plants.
 

There are three types of techniques used in Coast Salish weaving: twill, twining, and plain. The diagonals are created by the twill weave, where the weft travels under and over the warp. Twining uses two weft yarns twisting around the warp. The plain weave is a simple over and under warp and weft.
 
Amongst Coast Salish people, blankets made from mountain goat wool are a symbol of wealth and status. During ceremonial occasions objects of wealth are given as gifts, thus leaving the donor in a place of honor and prestige. Woven blankets are distributed during weddings, memorials, naming ceremonies, and as payment to shamans for their services.

 

 

October 6 - 30

Allie High

 

New Works

 

Opening Reception: First Thursday, Oct 6th

6-8pm

 

In October we invite Alaska-based contemporary artist Allie High (Aleut/Haida/Ts'msyen) to debut new prints and painted drums at the gallery, as well as possible works in silver and glass. High's print series are well-loved by collectors, who fall for her prints of animals rendered in flowing formline, and her boldly painted drums. In the past, she has contributed works in ceramic, wood and hand-carved sterling silver to our exhibitions, and we eagerly look forward to seeing what emerges from her studio for this show. 

Allie High was born in 1952 in Ketchikan, Alaska. Allie is Aleut and a Ts'msyen Raven Killerwhale crest Haida from Massett, B.C. Her great grandparents were among the first to follow Father Duncan to establish New Metlakatla in the Alaska territory. She has a Master's degree in interdisciplinary studies (art, theater, and sociology) from the University of Texas in Tyler, Texas. She also has a bachelor's degree in art education from the University of Oregon. She has taught art in public schools in Alaska and Texas as well as University courses in Alaska and Louisiana. Ms. High has been an artist in residence and lecturer in museums and other cultural venues.

 

November 3 - 26

Isabel Rorick

& Robin Rorick

 

Roots That Connect Us All:
A Mother & Son Collaboration

 

Opening Reception: First Thursday, November 3rd

6-8pm

 

 

"We are all a part of a giant complex weaving of life that requires respect and love to further interconnection. The trees are nourished by earth's elements and by the life cycle of the plants, insects, fish and all the other animals. In return the trees provide gifts of life for all those who are living. It is the same for the roots that connect us to our ancestors.

Weaving, painting and carving are a part of this sacred cycle and the energies that we portray are stories that come through us when we allow it and when we take the time to listen and feel. This is the way of our ancestors."

-Isabel & Robin Rorick

 

Stonington Gallery is extremely proud to present an exhibition of the art of renowned Haida weaver Isabel Rorick and her son, carver and painter Robin Rorick.

The Roricks come from Haida artistic royalty, as Isabel's great grandparents were Isabella and Charles Edenshaw, her grandmother was Florence Edenshaw Davidson, and her mother is weaver Primrose Adams. Other contemporary artists in this mighty lineage are Robert Davidson and Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas.

Isabel is widely considered the finest living spruce root weaver on the Coast, continuing the tradition of weaving exquisitely fine hats and baskets. Isabel and her mother are the only weavers in Canada making hats of this type. They are not woven on forms, giving each hat a unique shape and size.

Isabel weaves a hat band into the inside of each hat according to the traditional design meant to keep rain and sun off of one’s head. Each of her hats takes approximately six weeks worth of eight to ten hour days to weave. Isabel’s signature mark can be seen in the three rings woven into the top of the hat. The three rings are often seen on her baskets and rattles as well.

Robin Rorick was raised on Haida Gwaii and on Hornby Island, BC, and has taken up the mantle of his heritage. A carver of great elegance and refinement, his work has the tension, flow and dynamism of the Haida masters. He has recently been mentored by Robert Davidson in the method of painting on woven spruce root. For this exhibition Robin will be painting woven works by his mother, much as Charles Edenshaw did on Isabella's weavings. The "Killerwhale Basket" (shown above) is the first such collaboration. Robin will also debut carved works, including an extremely elegant Eagle Panel in cedar.

 

 

November 3 - 26

Joan Tenenbaum

 

Memory & Light

 

Opening Reception: First Thursday, November 3rd

6-8pm

 

 

We are proud to present an exhibition of Joan Tenenbaum's fine art jewelry in beautiful silver, gold, cloisonne and gems.

Shown here are progress photographs from the workbench, detailing just a few of the steps to making a new pendant for the exhibition. Tenenbaum's eye for quality, detail, wearability, and elegance is unparalleled.

We look forward to seeing what she has been busily creating throughout the year for this exhibition!

 

 

December 1 - January 2017

Into the Woods

 

 

 

 

Forests of the Northwest Coast

 

Opening Reception: First Thursday, December 1st

6-8pm

Last year's Resurgence: Rivers of the Northwest Coast exhibition was a landmark exhibition that brought together some fo the finest and most thoughtful works we have ever seen at our gallery. Our artists were inspired by their personal connections with rivers as far north as Alaska and as far south as Oregon, and showed their care, concern and love for these mighty water systems with artwork that was varied and wonderfully diverse. This year, we continue to explore what makes the Northwest such a vibrant, unique environment with Into the Woods: Forests of the Northwest Coast.

Forests have many faces: they are backdrops for epic journeys, where people become lost or found; places of transformation where what goes in is not the same as what comes out; places where our imaginations run wild and we face our own darkness, myths and secrets. Great mythological beings that inhabit these forests are as complex and fascinating as the web of life they live within. In much of Northwest Coast mythology they are places where animals and human-kind meet, clash, transform, and where the prey/predator divide is stark. 


The forest is a mighty meeting place: rivers and streams meet the roots of tremendous trees, salmon meet bears, nutrients are sucked up into the trees, and cycles continue. Forests drape the feet of mountains like skirts, connecting lowlands and alpine pinnacles, creating liminal spaces between the two where species and ecosystems change with every foot of altitude. At times, the woods are calming and peaceful, where we find communion with nature, animals, solitude; or they can be frightening, bewildering, without friend or end. 

In the hands of skilled artisans, one single giant western red cedar tree can provide wood for a canoe, house, bowl, mask, cape, hat, rattles and mats. To know a tree so well as to perfectly craft every part of it into something as beautiful as it was functional is a remarkable skill. 

 

 

 

 

 

All images copyright © Stonington Gallery or ZensPhoto.